Spicepedia

Name

  • Ajwain
  • Allspice
  • Anise
  • Annatto
  • Asafetida
  • Basil
  • Bay Leaf
  • Cardamom, Black
  • Cardamom, Green
  • Cinnamon
  • Cloves
  • Coriander
  • Cumin
  • Curry Leaf
  • Dill
  • Fennel
  • Fenugreek
  • Galangal
  • Garlic
  • Ginger
  • Horseradish
  • Juniper
  • Lavender
  • Lemongrass
  • Mace
  • Marjoram
  • Mint
  • Mustard Seed
  • Nutmeg
  • Oregano
  • Paprika
  • Peppercorn
  • Poppy Seed
  • Rosemary
  • Saffron
  • Sage
  • Sesame Seed
  • Star Anise
  • Tamarind
  • Tarragon
  • Thyme
  • Turmeric
  • Vanilla

Description

  • Also known as Bishop's Weed, this spice has a dark musty aroma. It is often used in breads and soups.
  • Often considered to be a combination of spices, these dried berries have flavors of cloves, pepper and anise. They are excellent with meats and stews.
  • Used in breads and sauces it is found mostly in Italian and Indian cuisines. A great seasoning for fish, soups, and consommes.
  • The seeds are used as a coloring agent for some cheeses and is a common ingredient to Central and South American cuisines.
  • Sometimes called Devil's dung, this stinky spice becomes pleasant after being heated.
  • Related to mint, basil is used in cuisines worldwide.
  • Laying the foundation for any good stock or stew, bay leaf is used for sauces too.
  • The pods of black cardamom are much more peppery than their green cousins. They are good for meat and fish marinades, and great in sauce reductions.
  • Having the aroma of camphor, green cardamom taste of cloves, pepper, and allspice. Ideal for asian style dishes. Great for fish sauces and broths and for poaching fruits.
  • Only the inner bark is used for this unique spice. It is used in breads and pastries worldwide. Makes a great seasoning for pork, chicken, and rice.
  • The clove has intense pepper flavors and is often used in tea, poached fruits, stews, and ice creams.
  • These seeds are found in dishes worldwide because it compliments so many different spices. A wonderful spice and an absolute for any chef. Adds up to a great tomato sauce. Ideal for soups and other sauces too. Look for brownish yellow seeds as these are the freshest.
  • These seeds are a staple in both Mexican and Indian cuisines. Fantastic when added to minced meat and gives a great touch to vegetarian dishes.
  • Found mostly in Southwest Asian cuisine, this leafis a mild yet unique ingredient. Adds a wonderful touch to meat broths and all kinds of rice.
  • This leaf has a delicate combination of sweet and sour. Goes excellent with salmon and many other fish preparations.
  • Found in Italian sausage, bread and sauces, this seed has a wonderful licorice flavor. Great when added to home smoking, meat marinades, fish soups, and with veal.
  • These seeds are as hard as a rock but once heated they release a mildly bitter flavor.
  • This relative of ginger is most often found in Asian cuisines.
  • A member of the onion family, this spice is found in just about every cuisine.
  • A root that unlimited uses. Strong sour flavors dominate the palate with this spice.
  • Another root spice, it can be found in Asia cuisines as well as western dishes. Great to accompany cured fish and roasted meats.
  • These berries have a bright cleansing flavor. It is found most often in Mediterranean cuisine. Used a lot in France with offal.
  • This luxurious flower is a favorite among French chefs. It's used in tea, bread, with meats and adds a wonderful touch to desserts.
  • Can be used in teas, soups and is great with seafood. Adds a great touch to sauces and marinades.
  • Commonly known for it's use in pepper spray, the husk around the nutmeg also has culinary uses. It works wonderfully with braised fish and potato dishes.
  • This herb is in the mint family and is closely related to oregano. Agreat addition to salad dressings and goes well with grilled meat and fish.
  • The leaves of this plant have a pleasant refreshing quality.
  • Coming in a variety of colors, these seeds are popular in Chinese, French, and American cuisines. These seeds are a wonderful addition to meat sauce reductions.
  • Always grated fresh for the maximum flavor. Can be found in drinks, pastries and in sauces. One of the potatoes best friends. Ideal for mash potatoes, cream sauces, and pastas.
  • Found in every herb garden, this is the grand daddy of all dried herbs. Adds a great touch for salad dressings and tomato sauces.
  • The flavors of this nightshade can range from sweet to spicy. Ideal for seasoning stews, veal and great in pumpkin soup.
  • This spice is by far the most used in the world.
  • Most often found in breads and other pastries.
  • Another member of the mint family, the spice has very unique flavor not found elsewhere. Great for roasting and grilling.
  • The world's most expensive spice, it is the stigma of the crocus sativus. There are only three stigmas in each blossom. Fish soup and risottos are all great with this precious spice.
  • The leaves of this plant have a strong flavor and can be used in everything from sauces to bread and goes well with braised and roasted meat.
  • There is little flavor difference between the black and white varieties of sesame. Both varieties have a bit of a nutty flavor and add a great touch when roasted for salads and dressings.
  • These seed pods are a key ingredient of Chinese cuisine. It has the aroma and flavor of fennel. Ideal for pastries and fruit desserts. Also great in fish sauces.
  • Found in Mexican and Asian dishes, the bean is sweet and tart.
  • The leaves of this plant are an integral part of French cuisine. Fantastic when combined with mustard. A great touch to fish and meat sauces.
  • Thyme has it's roots in Spain and France but can be found in cuisines worldwide. Excellent for meat marinades and sauces.
  • With it's mild flavors, turmeric is used as a coloring agent. It is found mostly in Indian cuisine. Great in sauces for fish, or when rubbed on chicken or fish. Ideal for rice a pasta too.
  • A member of the orchid family, this bean has some of the most complex and intense aromas. Wildly used for desserts and aromatic oils.

Family

  • Umbelliferae
  • Myrtle
  • Umbelliferae
  • Bixaceae
  • Umbelliferae
  • Lamiaceae
  • Laurel
  • Zingiberaceae
  • Zingiberaceae
  • Laurel
  • Myrtacea
  • Umbelliferae
  • Umbelliferae
  • Rutaceae
  • Umbelliferae
  • Umbelliferae
  • Fabaceae
  • Zingiberaceae
  • Alliaceae
  • Zingiberaceae
  • Cruciferae
  • Cupressaceae
  • Lamiaceae
  • Poaceae
  • Myristicaceae
  • Lamiaceae
  • Lamiaceae
  • Cruciferae
  • Myristicaeae
  • Lamiaceae
  • Solanaceae
  • Piperaceae
  • Papaveraceae
  • Lamiaceae
  • Iridaceae
  • Lamiaceae
  • Pedaliaceae
  • Illiaceae
  • Fabaceae
  • Asteraceae
  • Lamiaceae
  • Zingiberaceae
  • Orchidaceae

Origin

  • India, Pakistan, North Africa
  • Caribbean, Central America
  • Mediterranean, Central America
  • Brazil, Philippines
  • India, Pakistan, Egypt
  • America, Egypt, TurkeyÂ
  • Turkey, Egypt, Mediterranean, North America
  • Northern India, Pakistan
  • Southern India, Guatemala
  • Sri Lanka, Maldives
  • Madagascar, India, Sri Lanka
  • Europe, India
  • India, Mexico
  • India, Sri Lanka
  • North America, Europe, Turkey
  • Europe, India
  • India, Turkey, South America
  • China, Indonesia
  • Asia, Europe, North America
  • China, India, Australia, Central America
  • Eastern Europe, North America
  • Southern Europe
  • France, North America
  • Asia
  • Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Madagascar, India
  • Mediterranean, North America
  • Mediterranean, North America
  • India
  • Indonesia, Sri Lanka, Madagascar, India
  • Mediterranean, Mexico
  • Hungary
  • India, Central America
  • India, Turkey, North America, Australia
  • Turkey, North Africa, North America
  • Iran, Spain, India
  • North America, Europe
  • Africa, Mexico, China, Indonesia
  • China, Laos, Vietnam
  • Asia, Mexico
  • Southern Europe, Turkey, Mexico
  • Southern Europe
  • India
  • Madagascar, Tahiti, Mexico, Central America, India

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